COUNSELLING BLOG

Posts tagged sleep

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Some Factors that Contribute to Excessive Sleepiness

1. Poor sleep habits. Inconsistent or irregular sleep patterns; trying to function on too little sleep; taking long naps throughout the day; taking naps too close to bedtime.

2. Dietary factors. There are certain foods that make us feel more sleepy. These include candy, pop and desserts, peanuts and peanut butter, dairy products, turkey, bananas and apples. Also having a late lunch seems to contribute to mid-afternoon sleepiness.

3. Crash diets and weight loss pills may cause sleep abnormalities, which leave you feeling tired and drained.

3. Sedating drugs and alcohol. This includes many prescribed and over the counter medications. Also, not following the instructions properly can lead to bouts of sleepiness. This includes not paying proper attention to timing and dosages.

4. Having the cold or flu, or suffering from a minor infection.

5. Feeling anxious or depressed saps and drains your energy.

6. Having your period. Some women also report feeling more tired and sleepy just before their period or during ovulation.

7. Being physically active. This uses up our energy reserves.

8. Doing boring, monotonous, repetitive tasks.

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Some Facts on Dreams and Dreaming

1. Most dreams are based on visual images (Except in people who were either born blind, or who lost their sight at an early age). Occasionally, dreams will include sound and touch.

2. The normal rules of logic do not apply in dreams. For example, the dream may be taking place in one location – then, abruptly, the dreamer is translocated to a completely different place.

3. Most dreams occur in a house – but this is usually not your own home. The most frequently reported room is the living room. People rarely dream about their work place or school.

4. The most frequent scenario is the dreamer plus two other people.

5. Famous people seldom appear in our dreams. The vast majority of people dream about people who are significant to them, especially if there is an ongoing conflict.

6. Mundane activities (such as brushing your teeth) rarely appear in dreams.

7. Dreams tend not to be happy events, and the three most common reported emotions are anger, sadness and fear.

8. Some themes are so common that they are reported the world over. These universal themes include the loss of a tooth, falling or flying, exhibition, arriving late for exams or other important events, and being chased or attacked.

9. Cross-cultural research indicates that our dreams reflect normal life events in our own country and culture.

10. There appear to be some differences in the content of dreams between the two sexes. Specifically, women are more likely to dream about their children, family or household activities; men are more likely to dream about strangers, violence, sexual activity, achievement, and outdoor events.

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Some Facts on Dreams and Dreaming

1. Most dreams are based on visual images (Except in people who were either born blind, or who lost their sight at an early age). Occasionally, dreams will include sound and touch.

2. The normal rules of logic do not apply in dreams. For example, the dream may be taking place in one location – then, abruptly, the dreamer is translocated to a completely different place.

3. Most dreams occur in a house – but this is usually not your own home. The most frequently reported room is the living room. People rarely dream about their work place or school.

4. The most frequent scenario is the dreamer plus two other people.

5. Famous people seldom appear in our dreams. The vast majority of people dream about people who are significant to them, especially if there is an ongoing conflict.

6. Mundane activities (such as brushing your teeth) rarely appear in dreams.

7. Dreams tend not to be happy events, and the three most common reported emotions are anger, sadness and fear.

8. Some themes are so common that they are reported the world over. These universal themes include the loss of a tooth, falling or flying, exhibition, arriving late for exams or other important events, and being chased or attacked.

9. Cross-cultural research indicates that our dreams reflect normal life events in our own country and culture.

10. There appear to be some differences in the content of dreams between the two sexes. Specifically, women are more likely to dream about their children, family or household activities; men are more likely to dream about strangers, violence, sexual activity, achievement, and outdoor events.

Filed under counselling psychology therapy dreams sleep inspiration insomnia self help self improvement online counselling college

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Some Facts on Dreams and Dreaming

1. Most dreams are based on visual images (Except in people who were either born blind, or who lost their sight at an early age). Occasionally, dreams will include sound and touch.

2. The normal rules of logic do not apply in dreams. For example, the dream may be taking place in one location – then, abruptly, the dreamer is translocated to a completely different place.

3. Most dreams occur in a house – but this is usually not your own home. The most frequently reported room is the living room. People rarely dream about their work place or school.

4. The most frequent scenario is the dreamer plus two other people.

5. Famous people seldom appear in our dreams. The vast majority of people dream about people who are significant to them, especially if there is an ongoing conflict.

6. Mundane activities (such as brushing your teeth) rarely appear in dreams.

7. Dreams tend not to be happy events, and the three most common reported emotions are anger, sadness and fear.

8. Some themes are so common that they are reported the world over. These universal themes include the loss of a tooth, falling or flying, exhibition, arriving late for exams or other important events, and being chased or attacked.

9. Cross-cultural research indicates that our dreams reflect normal life events in our own country and culture.

10. There appear to be some differences in the content of dreams between the two sexes. Specifically, women are more likely to dream about their children, family or household activities; men are more likely to dream about strangers, violence, sexual activity, achievement, and outdoor events.

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What your sleep position says about you

1. The Fetus: This is the most common sleep position – curled up on the bed in a fetus position. Those who adopt this position are said to be tough on the outside but soft and gentle on the inside.  They seem hesitant and shy when you first meet them – but once you get to know them they seem very relaxed.

2. The Log: This is where the person lies on one side in bed with both of their arms down at their side. They are laid back people who are part of the in-crowd, but are comfortable and sociable with strangers, too. The downside is they’re sometimes a bit gullible.

3. The Yearner: These people lie on their side when they’re fast asleep, with both of their arms out in front of them. Although they seem open-minded, once they’ve reached a decision, it’s hard to persuade them to change their mind.

4. The Soldier: This is where the person likes to sleep on their back with both of their arms pinned closely to their sides. They are quiet and withdrawn, don’t like a fuss, but have high expectations of themselves (and, also, others).

5. The Freefaller: These people sleep on your stomach, with their head to one side, and their arms above their head, or wrapped around the pillow. They are usually extroverted, friendly, and outgoing. However, they are not risk takers, are often worriers, and are highly sensitive to any kind of criticism.

6. The Starfish: These people like to sleep on their back at night with their arms above their head, and often wrapped around the pillow. They are caring, loyal friends who are good listeners. However, they prefer to be backstage and keep a low profile.

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The Top 8 Recurring Dreams And What they Mean

1. Being chased. If you feel as if you’re running, and being chased, in your dream, it could mean you are running from some tough things in your life (or you may be running from an opportunity).

2. Falling. We often have a sense that we are falling in our dream – then we suddenly wake up and find we’re safe in our bed. This is said to be the fear that we are losing control, or it may be a fear of abandonment.

3. Having your teeth fall out. Like falling, this dream symbolizes powerlessness, and loss of control in some area of life. It can also mean you suffer from low self-esteem and are afraid to be honest and to speak your mind.

4. Being paralyzed when you try to run away. This is said to mean that you feel stuck or held back, or you can’t overcome some obstacle in your life.  

5. Flying.  Flying in your dreams is believed to signify a desire to express your creativity, to break out of the box and to reveal the real you.

6. Being submerged in water. This is said to mean we feel as if we’re drowning in life … that we’re feeling overwhelmed, and are close to breaking point.  

7. Being caught naked in public. We’re all afraid of being publicly exposed, as we know that we’re imperfect and inevitably fail. And though most of the time we can put on a good show, we fear we’ll be exposed for who and what we really are.

8. Being trapped or buried. It’s not hard to guess at the meaning here … as we often feel trapped by circumstances in life. This could be a dead end job, a bad relationship, a wrong decision or a mountain of debt. The message in the dream is you need to face the truth and start to take some steps to try and set yourself free.

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8 Tips for Wakening Up Early

1. Look for a strong enough reason to get up early in the morning. Without motivation it is hard to sustain.

2. Avoid stimulants late at night (tea, coffee, chocolate, nicotine etc) as they often interfere with healthy sleep patterns, and leave us feeling tired and worn out.

3. Related to this, start going to bed slightly earlier so you’ve had enough sleep when it’s time to get up.

4. Work up to rising earlier in small steps. Don’t just try to cut an hour from your sleep. Set the alarm 10 minutes early the first week … then 10 minutes earlier the week after that … and so on, until you’ve reached your goal.

5. Set multiple alarm clocks around the room so you have to get up to switch them all off.

6.  Write your goal out on a piece of paper and position it in a prominent spot (eg above your bed, at eye level on your bedroom door, or in the middle of your bathroom mirror).

7. Make yourself accountable to others. Have a friend (who gets up early themselves) ask you how well you did, each day.

8. Plan a schedule that requires you getting up early. If you deliberately fill your day with pre-arranged appointments you’ll have to rise early to fit everything in.

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Some Facts on Dreams and Dreaming

1. Most dreams are based on visual images (Except in people who were either born blind, or who lost their sight at an early age). Occasionally, dreams will include sound and touch.

2. The normal rules of logic do not apply in dreams. For example, the dream may be taking place in one location – then, abruptly, the dreamer is translocated to a completely different place.

3. Most dreams occur in a house – but this is usually not your own home. The most frequently reported room is the living room. People rarely dream about their work place or school.

4. The most frequent scenario is the dreamer plus two other people.

5. Famous people seldom appear in our dreams. The vast majority of people dream about people who are significant to them, especially if there is an ongoing conflict.

6. Mundane activities (such as brushing your teeth) rarely appear in dreams.

7. Dreams tend not to be happy events, and the three most common reported emotions are anger, sadness and fear.

8. Some themes are so common that they are reported the world over. These universal themes include the loss of a tooth, falling or flying, exhibition, arriving late for exams or other important events, and being chased or attacked.

9. Cross-cultural research indicates that our dreams reflect normal life events in our own country and culture.

10. There appear to be some differences in the content of dreams between the two sexes. Specifically, women are more likely to dream about their children, family or household activities; men are more likely to dream about strangers, violence, sexual activity, achievement, and outdoor events.

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