COUNSELLING BLOG

Posts tagged mood

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Tips for Killing a Bad Mood

1. You need to first decide that you want to change your feelings, and that you will make the effort – even if you can’t be bothered.
2. Smile at everyone you meet – even if you feel it’s fake. In time our actions often change the way we feel inside.
3. Look for something you can laugh at – decide to have some fun.
4. Choose to play it forward – do a random act of kindness. It will raise your self esteem and help to lighten up your mood.
5. Treat yourself with love and kindness; cut yourself some extra slack. For now, accept the way you’re feeling, and be patient with yourself.
6. Play some upbeat, happy music that you know will lift your mood – and maybe sing along, and get some friends to join in, too.

Filed under mood emotions psychology therapy counselling self improvement mental health mental illness inspiration motivation online counselling psychology

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When you’re Fighting Depression or a Negative Mood

1. Remind yourself that thoughts and feelings aren’t facts. Often we think extreme and negative things – which are not completely true in reality. Try to get perspective and to be more balanced – and try to counteract accusing, negative thoughts.

2. Be patient, understanding and gentle with yourself. When you’re fighting depression or are feeling overwhelmed then that uses up a lot of your energy. Accept that today is likely to be hard, and put fewer expectations on yourself.

3. Do one small thing as it will help you to get moving - and you’ll start feel more hopeful as you see yourself make progress. Also, keeping yourself busy will interrupt your thinking, and will help to stop your feelings from getting even worse.

4. Although it’s not usually helpful to isolate ourselves, be wise in the people that you choose to be around. If other people are too happy – or too harsh and critical – it will compound your feelings of negativity.

5. Remember that tomorrow could be a better day. You only need to find the energy to make it through today.  

Filed under counselling psychology therapy depression mood mental health mental illness self help self improvement inspiration motivation online counselling college

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How to Turn off Negative Thoughts

1. Notice when you are slipping into negative, absolutist ways of thinking where you think the worst of yourself, your life and your future.

2. Recognise that these are habitual ways of thinking. It’s what you always think when you start to feel bad.

3. Be aware of triggers. Often certain people and situations trigger painful, negative self-destructive thoughts. Try and distance yourself from these, or completely avoid them, if you possibly can.

4. Deliberately look for the counter arguments. For example, when have things been a bit better, when have you done something right, when has someone been kind and understanding?

5. Visualise positive things that make you happy, such as curling up with a book in bed, listening to your favourite music, and so on. Often changing our thinking to things that make us happy changes our negative feelings and thoughts.

6. Get into the habit of building yourself up, so you notice and affirm your successes, strengths, good intentions and positive traits.

Filed under counselling psychology therapy self help self improvement inspiration motivation thoughts mood mental health mental illness online counselling college

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Some Steps you can Take to Improve your Mood

1. Make a list. Sometimes we get depressed because we feel overwhelmed by all the things we have to do but haven’t got around to doing yet. Simply making a list can be a huge relief as you’re starting to bring things under control. That alone can help to lift your mood.

2. Take action. You’ve made a list, and you still feel overwhelmed? Then get started on the first thing you have to do. Is it a big task? Break it down and just do the smallest task possible. That way you’ll feel you’re starting to make progress.

3. Exercise. You don’t need to do a serious workout. Just going for a walk can change the way you feel.

4. Get out of the house and do something. Staying home all day can really get you down. But we often feel much better if we change environments.

5. Play some lively music and dance to the beat. Crank up whatever music you like to listen to. But choose something that’s happy and makes you sing along.

6. Talk about it. Getting things off your chest can make a big difference. It can also help you work out the reasons you feel down.

Filed under counselling psychology therapy self help self improvement inspiration motivation mood mental health mental illness online counselling college

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Some steps you can take to improve your mood

1. Make a list. Sometimes we get depressed because we feel overwhelmed by all the things we have to do but haven’t got around to doing yet. Simply making a list can be a huge relief as you’re starting to bring things under control. That alone can help to lift your mood.

2. Take action. You’ve made a list, and you still feel overwhelmed? Then get started on the first thing you have to do. Is it a big task? Break it down and just do the smallest task possible. That way you’ll feel you’re starting to make progress.

3. Exercise. You don’t need to do a serious workout. Just going for a walk can change the way you feel.

4. Get out of the house and do something. Staying home all day can really get you down. But we often feel much better if we change environments.

5. Play some lively music and dance to the beat. Crank up whatever music you like to listen to. But choose something that’s happy and makes you sing along.

6. Talk about it. Getting things off your chest can make a big difference. It can also help you work out the reasons you feel down.

Filed under counselling psychology therapy mental health education school exams self improvement self help goals success online counselling college Mood

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Ways to Increase your Happiness

1. Don’t indulge in negative self-talk. Of course you’re less than perfect. All of us are. But you also have good points and things that you do well. Focus on your growth and your positive traits. Affirm your different strengths, and be glad that you are you!

2. We all need support when we’re feeling sad or down, but some individuals are always negative. Try and minimize the time you spend with those who like to whine – or take a different line and turn the conversation round (so the emphasis is on what is good and positive).

3. Think of all things you are grateful for – and show appreciation and gratitude to others.  

4. Try to see the bigger picture, and keep things in perspective. We all have ups and down – it’s just called life experience!

5. Don’t allow other people to control how you react. Decide that you’ll respond – and thus maintain your dignity. That way, you’ll feel more powerful and you’ll have more self respect.

6.  Decide to be laid back,  and try to take life in your stride. Who wants to be uptight or feel they’re pressurised and stressed?

Filed under counselling psychology therapy happiness Mood mental health mental illness self improvement self help success online counselling college

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The Benefits of Exercise

As well as being good for our physical health, exercise is good for our mental health. Benefits include the following:

·         It enhances your mood

·         It reduces your stress levels and enhances your ability to cope effectively with stress

·         It raises your self-confidence and self-esteem

·         It gives you a sense of personal pride in your abilities, achievements and skills

·         It positively changes the way you see, and feel about, your body

·         It gives you more energy and reduces feelings of lethargy and apathy

·         It decreases symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Filed under counselling psychology therapy Mood exercise sport mental health mental illness self improvement self help online counselling college

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Some Random Findings from Psychology

1.    Men use around 12,500 words a day whereas women use around 22,000 words a day.

2.    Having a pet enhances your relationship skills.

3.    Laughing reduces stress and helps to strengthen your immune system.

4.    Laughter and smiling are contagious

5.    Six foods that have been shown to improve your mood include oatmeal, cereal, salmon, milk, dark chocolate and bananas.

6.    People who drink a moderate amount are happier than those who abstain from alcohol.

7.    Using technology can increase stress and aggression levels.

8.    Many animals mourn a loss in the same way as human beings do.

9.    Our nose can identify over 50,000 different scents.

10. The human brain is move active in the night than in the daytime.

Filed under psychology facts counselling psychology therapy insight relationships life brain psychology research mood online counselling college

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Music and Emotions

We all know that music affects how we feel and greatly influences, or changes, our mood. Specifically, research shows that we use music for the following purposes:

1.    For entertainment – We use music to feel happy when we’re passing the time doing things like driving, working on assignments, travelling, housework and surfing the web.

2.    To revitalise us – We uses music to help us waken up in the morning, and to calm us down at the end of the day.

3.    To provide a strong sensation - Music can have a profound affect and stir up deep emotions, or provide a chill or thrill. Just think of how it’s used by screen writers in great movies!

4.    To divert us from unpleasant, or uncomfortable, thoughts – It serves as a distraction from unpleasant thoughts which drop into our mind when there is silence in the room.

5.    To release blocked or powerful emotions – Intense and moving music that matches deep emotions can help to bring release, and help to cleanse and heal our pain.

6.    For reminiscing - Music can help us to return to the past, and resurrect old memories of people and events. In this way, it brings comfort and releases happiness.

7.    For inspiration – Some music is inspiring and helps to clear our thinking. It motivates our passion and helps us dream again.

8.    For solace - Shared feelings can connect us with other human beings – with those who’ve suffered with us, or with someone we have lost. It is, therefore, therapeutic and frees us to move on.

Filed under music emotions mood feelings counselling therapy psychology mental health online counselling college

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Managing Depression

Depression is a recognised clinical condition. You can’t just “try and pull yourself together” … or “snap out of it” … or “get over it”. However, there are a few things that may help improve your mood so it may be worth giving them a try. For example,

 1. We know that exercise changes brain chemistry and acts a natural antidepressant - so why not go for a walk or a run.

 2. Hanging out with people who accept and love us is often a comfort when we’re feeling depressed. But make sure it’s someone who’s generally upbeat as a critical person will make you feel worse!

3. Make yourself do something you used to enjoy as often this can stir buried pleasant feelings. It shifts your focus from pain and emptiness to something that may give you a sense of joy (even it’s muted or relatively mild).

4. Make sure you go outside, and your surroundings are well lit, as this helps to lessen our feelings of depression (especially if you suffer from SAD).

5. Take a bath or shower, and put on some clean clothes. Surprisingly, this often can improve our mood.             

6. Tidy up or clean – even if it’s just one corner – as that can bring a sense of accomplishment.

   

Filed under counselling psychology therapy mental health mental illness depression mood disorders SAD life abnormal psycholgy online counselling college mood

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Sleep Deprivation and Mental Health

We’ve all experienced a sleepless night - and know how it affects our mood the next day.  We feel out of sorts, are easily annoyed, and feel as if our problems are insurmountable. However, our perspective is restored by a good night’s sleep and we return to being reasonable and sane again!

This anecdotal evidence has also been researched, and scientific studies have confirmed that it is true – and that sleep deprivation affects our mental health.

For example, some studies conducted by the University of Pennsylvania (Dinges et al., 1997) revealed that only receiving 4.5 hours of sleep a night for a period of a week led to subjects feeling more stressed, negative, angry, sad, and worn out. However, once they returned to normal levels, their mood improved significantly.

Perhaps of greater concern, is the long term effect of sleep deprivation on mental health. For example, we know that roughly one fifth of insomniacs will be diagnosed with major depression (Breslau et al., 1996). Also, they are at higher risk of anxiety disorders (Weissman et al, 1996) – and especially of developing panic disorders. In fact, the risk disorder is 20 times greater than is found in those who are not sleep deprived (Neckelmann, D. et al., 2007).

Thus, a chronic loss of sleep can affect how we feel and can also be linked to mental health concerns.  

Filed under Christian counselling anxiety disorders counselling feelings insomnia medicine mood online counselling college panic disorders psychiatry psychology self help sleep sleep deprivation sleep disorders therapy mental health information