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How to Choose a Career

1. Think about what you really enjoy. What brings you alive? What could you do for hours – even if you weren’t paid to do it?

2. What do others say you’re good at? Sometimes we’re blind to our gifts and strengths but usually other people will comment on them. What do others notice, and constantly affirm?

3. What’s your work style? Do you prefer a more structured environment? Do you prefer to work with other people or on your own? Do you like to follow guidelines and be told the rules, or do you likely to be creative and have autonomy?

4. Where would you like to work? In a hospital, in a school, in an office, in your own home? Would you prefer the type of job where you travel frequently, and perhaps to different countries all around the world?

5. How important is money to you? Are you content with “just enough” or do you want to earn a huge amount? Do you want a regular and predictable monthly income or would you prefer that your salary was based on bonuses and commission?  

6. How important is the work-life balance to you? Some careers require you to work long hours, to travel on a whim and to put your projects first. Others give employees more flexibility. They let you choose your hours and the days when you will work.

7. How do you feel about having to work shifts, on evenings, at weekends, or on public holidays? There are many careers that require you to do that.

8. How well do you function under pressure and stress? Again, decide if that is something that you mind in a career.

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Careers in Psychology

According to The College Majors Handbook, the top 10 jobs for people who have graduated with a bachelor’s psychology degree are:

1.    Top- and mid-level management and administration

2.    Sales

3.    Social service/ social work related jobs

4.    Other types of management position

5.    Labor-relations, personnel and staff training

6.    General administration jobs

7.    Real estate, business services and insurance

8.    Marketing.

 For this with a masters or doctoral degree, career opportunities include:

1.    Clinical psychologist

2.    Counsellor

3.    Social worker

4.    School counsellor

5.    Educational psychologist

6.    Parole officer

7.    Industrial/ organisational psychologist

8.    Forensic psychologist

 If you’re interested in taking a quiz to help figure out your preferred psychology-related career then check out this link: http://psychology.about.com/library/quiz/bl-psychologycareerquiz.htm

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What are the Different Branches of Psychology?

Abnormal Psychology: This explores psychopathology and abnormal behavior. Examples of disorders covered in this field include depression, OCD, sexual deviation and dissociative disorder.

Biopsychology: This looks at the role the brain and neurotransmitters play in influencing our thoughts, feelings and behaviours. It combines neuroscience and the study of basic psychology.

Clinical Psychology: The focus here is the assessment and appropriate treatment of mental illness and abnormal behaviours.

Cognitive Psychology: This branch of psychology focuses attention on perception and mental processes. For example, it looks at how people think about and process experiences and events – their automatic thoughts and core beliefs. Also, how they learn, remember and retrieve information.

Comparative Psychology: This field of psychology studies animal behavior. Comparative psychologists work closely with biologists, ecologists, anthropologists, and geneticists.

Counseling Psychology: Here, the focus is on providing therapeutic interventions for clients who are struggling with some mental, social, emotional or behavioural issue. It also looks at living well, so people reach their maximum potential in life.

Developmental Psychology: This looks at lifespan human development, from the cradle to the grave. It looks at what changes, and what stays the same, or even deteriorates over time. Also, whether growth and change is continuous, or is associated with certain ages and stages. Another area of interest is the interaction of genes and the environment.

Educational Psychology: This focuses attention on learning, remembering, performing and achieving. It includes the effects of individual differences, gifted learners and learning disabilities.

Experimental Psychology: Although all of psychology emphasises the central importance of the scientific method, designing and applying experimental techniques, then analysing and interpreting the results is the main job of experimental psychologists. They work in a wide range of settings, including schools, colleges, universities, research centers, government organisation and private businesses and enterprises.

Forensic Psychology: Psychology and the law intersect in this field. It is where psychologists (clinical psychologists, neurologists, counselling psychologists etc) share their professional expertise in legal or criminal cases.

Health Psychology: This branch of psychology promotes physical, mental and emotional health – including preventative and restorative strategies. It looks at how people deal with stress, and cope with and recover from, illnesses.

Human Factors Psychology: This is an umbrella category that looks at such areas as ergonomics, workplace safety, human error, product design, and the interaction of humans and machines.

Industrial-Organizational Psychology: This applies findings from theoretical psychology to the workplace. Its goal is increasing employee satisfaction, performance, productivity – and matching positions to employees’ strengths. Other areas of interest are group dynamics, and the development of leadership skills.

Social Psychology: This is what many people think of when they hear the word “psychology”. It includes the study of group behaviour, social norms, conformity, prejudice, nonverbal behaviour/ body language, and aggression.

Sports Psychology: This area investigates how to increase and maintain motivation, the factors that contribute to peak performance, and how being active can enhance our lives.

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Successful Interviewing Tips

1. Before applying for a job, find out as much as you can about it – and make sure it’s something you want to do!

2. Also, find out what you can about the interviewers. For example, what are their names and job titles? What other jobs have they done in the past? You can often uncover a lot of information by simply googling peoples’ names and positions.

3. Try and find out about the company’s normal interviewing style. For example, is it likely to be one-on-one interview, or will you be interviewed by a couple of people, or will there be an interview panel? Also, will you be required to sit any kinds of test (general knowledge, case studies, IQ tests etc.)?

4.  If possible, connect with others who have undergone a similar interview. Ask them for tips and ideas – or things to watch out for, or how best to prepare.

5. Research the company. It’s important to know as much as possible about the company’s history, what it does now, it’s plans for the future – and the expectations associated with the job.

6. Be clear about what you have to offer the company. It’s important that you match their needs to your experience, abilities and personality. Practising selling yourself to them!

7. If possible, rehearse the interview with a friend.

8. Pay attention to your appearance. Dress appropriately (err on the side of dressing conservatively); make sure you look tidy and smart; brush your hair and teeth; wear perfume or aftershave (but not so much that it’s overpowering).

9. Check out the directions is advance (if necessary drive there the day before to make sure you don’t get lost). Arrive 5 minutes early for the interview.

10. Be confident, respectful, polite, truthful, positive and enthusiastic. Think carefully before you respond – use proper grammar, and don’t speak too quickly.   

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How to Choose a Career

1. Think about what you really enjoy. What brings you alive? What could you do for hours – even if you weren’t paid to do it?

2. What do others say you’re good at? Sometimes we’re blind to our gifts and strengths but usually other people will comment on them. What do others notice, and constantly affirm?

3. What’s your work style? Do you prefer a more structured environment? Do you prefer to work with other people or on your own? Do you like to follow guidelines and be told the rules, or do you likely to be creative and have autonomy?

4. Where would you like to work? In a hospital, in a school, in an office, in your own home? Would you prefer the type of job where you travel frequently, and perhaps to different countries all around the world?

5. How important is money to you? Are you content with “just enough” or do you want to earn a huge amount? Do you want a regular and predictable monthly income or would you prefer that your salary was based on bonuses and commission?  

6. How important is the work-life balance to you? Some careers require you to work long hours, to travel on a whim and to put your projects first. Others give employees more flexibility. They let you choose your hours and the days when you will work.

7. How do you feel about having to work shifts, on evenings, at weekends, or on public holidays? There are many careers that require you to do that.

8. How well do you function under pressure and stress? Again, decide if that is something that you mind in a career.

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Specialities in Psychology

1. Biopsychology/ neuroscience: This looks at the relationship between thinking, behaviour and biology. It includes investigating the way chemistry and biology influence the structure and functioning of the brain and nervous system.

2. Clinical psychology: This specialising in diagnosing and treating personality and mental disorders.

3. Cognitive psychology: This focuses on our mental processes – thinking, problem solving, reasoning, creativity, memory, language and intelligence.

4. Counseling psychology: This is concerned with the mental, social and emotional wellbeing of people. It includes career counseling.

5. Developmental psychology: This studies lifespan human development – from the birth to the grave.

6. Educational psychology: This focuses on the educational process, including testing the intellectual, social, emotional and behavioural development of children.  

7. Experimental psychology: Experiments and research are conducted in all areas of psychology. However, experimental psychology specifically investigates motivation, sensation, emotion, learning and perception – in both animals and humans.

8. Forensic psychology: This applies knowledge gleaned from social science research to the legal system. (For example, in jury selection).

9. Gender and cultural psychology: This looks at the differences and similarities between males and females in a single culture, and across different cultures.

10. Health psychology: This investigates the effects of physical, emotional, social and environmental factors on health and wellbeing.

11. Industrial/ organizational psychology: This applies findings from psychology to the workplace. It includes group dynamics, motivation, identifying and training leaders, skills training, the effects of rewards and punishments, etc

12. Social psychology: This looks at how social factors and interpersonal relationships shape behavioural patterns and norms, affect altruism and aggression, influence conformity, etc.

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Careers in Psychology

According to The College Majors Handbook, the top 10 jobs for people who have graduated with a bachelor’s psychology degree are:

1.    Top- and mid-level management and administration

2.    Sales

3.    Social service/ social work related jobs

4.    Other types of management position

5.    Labor-relations, personnel and staff training

6.    General administration jobs

7.    Real estate, business services and insurance

8.    Marketing.

 

For this with a masters or doctoral degree, career opportunities include:

1.    Clinical psychologist

2.    Counsellor

3.    Social worker (including mental health social worker)

4.    School counsellor

5.    Educational psychologist

6.    Parole officer

7.    Industrial/ organisational psychologist

8.    Forensic psychologist

If you’re interested in taking a quiz to help figure out your preferred psychology-related career then check out this link: http://psychology.about.com/library/quiz/bl-psychologycareerquiz.htm

Filed under counselling psychology therapy careers jobs mental illness social work health social services online counselling college